Healthy Family, Healthy Home, Healthy Pets, Healthy Spirit, Uncategorized

Supporting Your Aging Dog: Diet and Supplements, Part 3

*Disclaimer* This information is in no way intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. 

**UPDATE- some reason this post was deleted from my blog, so I am reposting.  Sadly since the first post of this blog, Daisy has crossed the Rainbow Bridge**

Diet: As your dog ages, his/her diet needs will change. He/She may become less active, weight gain is always a concern with older dogs.  Extra weight can cause tremendous issues on old bones and joints.  Making my sure my dog’s diet is clean and nutrient dense is extremely important to me.  It also helps me manage her allergies.  I have been making her food for the past 7 or 8 years, with great success.  Be sure to speak to your vet before making any changes to your dog’s diet.

  • Bone broth.  This has been the key to encourage my girl to eat some days. And so easy to do. I usually give Daisy about a cup of warm bone broth every morning with her breakfast.
  • Steamed veggies.  A great source of vitamins and minerals.  Steaming them is best for older dogs, because it aids in easy digestion.
  • Organ meats. Be sure they are from grass-feed, antibiotic free animals.  Organ meats are the most nutrient dense part of any animal.  Again with older dogs, it’s best to boil the organs before they eat them, unless your dog has been on a RAW diet all along.
  • Wild Game: A great addition to a dog’s diet at any age.  Most wild game, depending where it is hunted/fished  will be the cleanest source of proteins and healthy fats you can feed your dog (and yourself).  Again, the organ meats from wild game is a great additions.
  • Collagen and Gelatin. I use Collagen every day in my coffee, “healthy” lattes or smoothies.  I also using it in Daisy’s dog food.  Collagen and gelatin helps maintain healthy joints, tissue, skin and can aid in skin allergies.  Collagen can be given at any stage of a dog’s life, and the sooner it’s given, the better.  My favorite brand is Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides and Vital Proteins Gelatin
  • Grain free foods. Dogs were not designed to consume grains. Just like humans, grains can cause inflammation in a dog’s body. This can be especially harmful in an aging dog that may have arthritis. Many times grains can cause itchy skin and yeasty ears.  This is the case for my girl.  For most of her life, I have either made her food or choose a grain-free dog food.
  • Turmeric Paste aka Golden Paste: Turmeric is a powerful antioxidant, an effective anti-inflammatory, can help prevent and even treat cancer and protects the liver from toxins, along with many other benefits. Here’s a link to the recipe I use Turmeric Golden Paste for Dogs

Herbs: Herbs are a great way to assist in supporting your aging friend.  A group of herb known as Adaptogens, which are a diverse group of plants that contain substances that help the body adapt to various life stress.  Some examples of adaptogens are Ashwagandha, Rhodiola, Schizandra, Siberian Ginseng, a variety of mushrooms, and many others. Again be sure to do your research before giving you pet any herbal supplements.  I would strongly suggest working with a Holistic Veterinarian or a veterinarian that is trained in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Cannabis Oil: I was never a strong believer in the healing power of cannabis oil, until I has suffered extreme flank pain.  I thought it was kidney stones, I had x-rays, MRI, blood test, chiropractic adjustments, nothing helped.  I did not want to take pain killers or antibiotics, because the source of the pain was unknown.  So I tried cannabis oils.  My pain went from a 10 plus, to a 2 within the matter of 15 minutes.  Since this worked so well for me, I thought it would help Daisy and began researching it. I have used it in small doses when her pain is really bad.  Since her mobility has declined dramatically over the past several weeks, I’ve been using it on a regular basis, with great success.  Be sure to be working with your veterinarian before giving your dog cannabis oil. This is a great article explaining the use of cannabis oil on dogs Cannabis Oil for Dogs: Everything You Need to Know .  And this article list places to purchase cannabis oil, along with another great explanation of how it works Cannabis For Your Dog: How it Can Help.

Epsom Salt Baths: I added Epsom Salt baths to this part of the series, because magnesium is a mineral that is missing from not only our pet’s diet, but ours as well.  A great way to get magnesium into the body is through Epsom Salt.  Epsom Salt baths are just as beneficial for your dog, as it is for you.  When Epson Salt is added to water, it breaks down to magnesium and sulfate, which is absorb into the body via the skin. Epsom Salt Baths aid in arthritis pain, swelling, sore muscle and helps cleanse and soften the fur.

Some dogs, won’t be so excited for this one. However my girl doesn’t mind taking baths.  Be sure the water is warm and the tub full enough so that the water covers most of your dog.  Allow your dog to soak 10-15 minutes.

For Small Dogs under 10 lbs: 1/4-1/2 cup of Epsom salt
For Dogs 10 lbs-40 lb: 1/2 cup-1 cup of Epsom Salt
For dog over 40 lbs: 1-2 cups of Epsom Salt

Rescue Remedy: Is a liquid of flower essences that can be given to your dog, via a dropper into the mouth, in your dog’s water, applied to their gums or even rubbed on their paws.  The most common brand is Bach’s Original Flower Remedies.  Bach’s brand contains the essences of 5 different beneficial flowers.  It assists with their emotional support and is helpful for dogs that are hypersensitive, fearful and have a hard time adjusting to new situations.  I’m not sure how helpful this has been for Daisy? I haven’t seen a dramatic change in her behavior during stressful situations, but each animal is different.  You might find this very helpful for your pet.  I know when I was the kennel manager at a Humane Society, we used in every dogs water. I found with some dogs it was super helpful, while others it had no effect on them.  For more information: Rescue Remedy for Pets

Check out my other post in this series. Supporting Your Aging Dog: Body Work Modalities and Supporting Your Aging Dog: Using Essential Oils

 

Healthy Family, Healthy Home, Healthy Pets, Healthy Spirit

Supporting Your Aging Dog: With Essential Oils, Part 2

*Disclaimer* This information is in no way intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. 

 

Essential Oils (ESOs) are used everyday in our home.  I have been using ESOs for well over 15 year, and use them on my girl regularly.  Be sure you do your research before using oils, and talk to your vet or an aromatherapist about using oils on your pets. When using ESOs, be sure to dilute them in a carrier oil such as fractionated coconut or olive oil, or diffuse them with an ESO diffuser. I don’t ever recommend having animals ingest ESOs, although you will find a lot of Wellness Advocates with ESOs businesses that advise otherwise.  Make sure your information source or the person your getting advice from is well trained, preferably an aromatherapist.

Animals metabolize ESOs differently than humans, therefore some ESOs that are safe for humans to use, may not be safe for your pets.  And always take extra precautions if using ESOs on cats.

The other thing to be aware of is being sure when using ESOs is that you are using a therapeutic grade, that does not any contain synthetics, additives, or artificial ingredients of any kind.  Organic is always best, so the oils are not from plants exposed to pesticides and/or herbicides or grown in soils containing toxins.

I like to diffuse the following blend next to my dog’s crate. It’s not only beneficial for dogs, but for their humans as well.

Daisy’s Dream Blend

20 Drops of Frankincense: Healthy Cognition, Reduces Sadness
20 Drops of Lavender: Reduces Stress, fear and sadness
10 Drops of Ylang Ylang: Reduces Anxiety
10 Drops of Bergamont: Reduces Sadness and Stress, Calming
5 Drops of Vetiver: Supports Cognition and is calming

This blend should give you approximately 3-4 mls, which you can add 1-3 drops to a diffuser.  You can also as 3-4 drops to a 4 oz glass spray bottle of distilled water and spray on blankets and throughout the environment.

One of my favorite sites that has great resources for ESO use for pets is The Dog Oiler.

Many times I will just put a drop or 2 of Lavender oil in my hands, and give Daisy a good massage.

Check out the other blogs post in this series:

Supporting Your Aging Dog: Body Work Modalities

Supporting Your Aging Dog: Diet and Supplements

In Love, Light and Magic
~Jen and Daisy~

 

Healthy Family, Healthy Home, Healthy Pets, Healthy Recipes

Turmeric Golden Paste for Dogs

Daisy 2009

My little Golden Healer Daisy, will be 13 this year.  Over the past year she has been really slowing down.  In her prime, she loved to do agility, nose work training, hiking, swimming, running, pretty much anything as long as she is with me. (It’s amazing to be adored so much.) With age, has come some serious arthritis.  I do a lot of supportive modalities to help ease her pain and keep her comfortable.  One of the things I do to help support her aging body is give her Golden Paste.

Golden Paste is a concoction of turmeric, water, fresh ground pepper and coconut oil.  Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a perennial plants that grows 5 to 6 feet high in the tropical regions of South Asia.  It has been used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory, treat digestive and liver problems, skin diseases, and wound treatment, for well over 4,000 years.  It’s well known for it’s powerful antioxidants, effective anti-inflammatory properties, study have shown it is helpful in preventing and even treating cancer, aids in protecting the liver from toxins, and so much more.

When turmeric is ingested on it’s own it has poor bio-availability in the body, which is believed to be a result of being rapidly metabolized in the liver and intestinal wall.  Studies have shown that combining turmeric with black pepper increases the bio-availability of turmeric by 2,000% in humans and 154% in rats, according to the October 1992 issue of the journal Clinical Pharmacokinetics. 

How To Make Turmeric Golden Paste For Dogs

Australian veterinarian Dr Doug English has seen great results with a turmeric recipe he developed called Golden Paste.  His website provides a lot of supportive documentation on the benefits of turmeric. Here is his recipe:   Dr. Doug English

Ingredients:

1/2 Cup of Organic Turmeric
1-1 1/2 Cup of Filtered Water
1 1/2 Teaspoon of Fresh Ground Black Pepper
1/4 Cup of Organic Cold Pressed Coconut Oil

Directions:

1. Add turmeric and water in a pan (Start with a cup of water, add more if needed)
2. Stir on medium/low heat for 7-10 minutes, or until paste consistency (if too watery add more turmeric)
3. Add pepper and coconut oil, stir well
4. Allow the mixture to cool, then store in an air tight jar in the fridge for up to 2 weeks

*If the mixture doesn’t mix well, you can put it in the blender for 1-2 minutes and it will incorporate the mixture.

Giving  Golden Paste To Your Dog

You can add the Golden Paste directly to your dog’s meals by mixing it with some water, raw goats milk or kefir. Some may even lick it off a spoon. Most dogs don’t mind the taste at all, however my girl does!  Mixing it with goats milk or bone broth, has been helpful to get her to eat it.

Start with about ¼ to ½ tsp, depending on the size of your dog. You can increase the amount from there, up to about a Tbsp for larger dogs.

If you don’t want to go through the trouble of making the Golden Paste, Primal Pet Foods carries a Golden Raw Goats Milk that offers the benefits of the turmeric, and probotics from the goats milk, along with good health fats.

In Love and Magic,

~Jen and Daisy~

*Disclaimer* This information is in no way intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.